Unless Faced With Popular Opposition, Syriza Will Turn Into an Empty Promise

Unless Faced With Popular Opposition, Syriza Will Turn Into an Empty Promise

The Syriza government has not shown publicly that it views exiting the Euro as a real option, leaving it at a dead end, captive to the whims of Germany. (Photo: Christos Siarris / Shutterstock.com) Truth-Out.org Friday, 27 February 2015 13:40 By Joshua Tartakovsky, Truthout | News Analysis In the latest agreement with the Eurogroup, in which the Greek government had won four months of respite, Syriza had also managed to backtrack on its election promises and agree to the imperatives laid out by Eurogroup chief, Jeroen Dijsselbloem. It has been untruthful, yet it will inevitably run into problems along the road. Earlier, it could have been suggested that Syriza has a Plan B in mind. One could have interpreted the meeting held between Tsipras and the Russian ambassador to Greece immediately following his appointment as prime minister as a sign indicating that Greece has additional cards on the table. Furthermore, it could be argued that the Greek government intends to pursue a process of radicalizing the public, which is in favor of remaining in the Euro, by making it go through the process of negotiations, rejection and humiliation. Faced with the suffocating demands of the Troika, now renamed Institutions, the public would realize that it cannot free itself from austerity as long as it remains part of the Euro. However, the Syriza government has not shown publicly that it views exiting the Euro as a real option, leaving it at a dead end, captive to the whims of Germany. Following the Eurogroup agreement, Prime Minister Tsipras said that “we succeeded at the end of our main purpose,” while clarifying that Greece “won the battle...
Brazil Disses the US, Re-elects Putin-Friendly Rousseff

Brazil Disses the US, Re-elects Putin-Friendly Rousseff

Photo by Wilson Dias/Agencia Brasil published on jornalgrandebahia.com.br Russia Insider By Joshua Tartakovsky 2 November, 2014     Rousseff and Putin – working toward a multipolar world The successful reelection of Dilma Rousseff to the presidency of Brazil on Sunday, October 26th, will undoubtedly give a boost not only to Russian-Brazil relations but also to the BRICS Development Bank and to the emergence of multipolar world more generally. Whereas the US media has for the most part tacitly supported the center-right candidate Alécio Neves while warning that a Rousseff reelection will strongly harm international investments in Brazil, Brazilians have decided to vote for who they believed would best serve their best interest and granted Dilma Rousseff 51.6% of the vote. While Neves was supportive of stronger ties with the US and did not voice support for the new BRICS Development Bank that stands as an alternative, however modest, to the International Monetary Fund, Rousseff has shown that she is not fearful of expressing Brazil’s independent voice in the international arena. Following the tapping of her private conversations by the United States National Security Agency, Rousseff canceled her trip to the United States in September 2013. Trade with the US on defense and energy had also declined. In her speeches in the United Nations in 2013 and 2014, Rousseff warned against US hubris and its meddling in other countries affairs. It may be interesting to note that Rousseff was not fearful of taking a strong position after Brazil’s trust in the US was violated, arguing that such behavior should not be carried out by partners, much as Russia did not hesitate to take strong actions following the US support for fascist groups who carried out the coup in...
Why the Brazilian Elections on Sunday Are Relevant For People Outside Brazil?

Why the Brazilian Elections on Sunday Are Relevant For People Outside Brazil?

Picture by Joshua Tartakovsky nsnbc international Sun, Oct. 26th, 2014 By Paula Fortes Aguillera Campos and Joshua Tartakovsky   Fortes Aguillera & Tartakovsky (nsnbc) : The presidential elections in Brazil this Sunday may seem to many in the United States and Europe as an affair that has little relevance to their lives. In the minds of many Westerners, the elections that are taking place in the southern cone of the Americas where poverty is still wide spread, have little relevance neither for the state of affairs worldwide nor for Western states. This line of thinking however is out of touch with reality. The upcoming elections in which the current Brazilian President Dilma Roussef of the center-left Worker’s Party (PT) will be competing for reelection against Aécio Neves, the former governor of the state of Minas Gerais, leader of the center-right Social Democrat Party, Aécio Neves, will determine the future of not only 200 million Brazilians but of people throughout the world. Here is why. While President Dilma Roussef has advocated that Brazil pursue its own independent foreign policy as a global leader acting independently of Washington’s orbit, Senator Alecio Neves would pursue closer collaboration with the US, according to his economic adviser. Dilma has pursued close talks with Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa leading to the creation of a $100 billion-strong alternative bank that would compete with the current Western-dominated International Monetary Fund. On the other hand, Neves is arguing for closer ties with the US and Europe which would mean that Brazil would follow Washington’s line and not seek to challenge it globally. Since the new BRICS development bank will not follow the IMF in seeking to impose the much-criticised ‘Washington Consensus’ on...