WHEN IT COMES TO HEZBOLLAH, ISRAEL HAS RUSSIA’S EAR

WHEN IT COMES TO HEZBOLLAH, ISRAEL HAS RUSSIA’S EAR

Photo by Joshua Tartakovsky © November 2015. All Rights Reserved. By Joshua Tartakovsky, 9 March 2016 It appears then that while Iran and Russia have a tight alliance in Syria, they also have their major disagreements and contradicting interests, more than what meets the eye The Islamic Republic of Iran and the Russian Federation have been working more closely than ever in Syria against various Islamist terrorist groups. Indeed, the massive Russian military operation against terrorism in Syria, following a formal request for help by the lawful Government of Syria, took place after a visit to Moscow by Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani. It is widely believed that Soleimani, whom many consider a brilliant military strategist, took a central part in planning the Russian operation in Syria. The Syrian Arab Army, Russian forces, Iranian forces and Hezbollah have been working closely on theater. From the very beginning since plans of a Russian war on terrorism in Syria became known, Israel has been very worried about the possibility that advanced Russian missiles will reach Hezbollah and will be used against Israel in a future confrontation between the two. Israeli civilians suffered from shelling by Hezbollah in past confrontations as the city of Haifa has been targeted. It is fair to assume that at the time Netanyahu rushed to meet Putin, the deal probably was that Israel will share intelligence on various terror groups in Syria, and in return, Russia will guarantee that advanced military equipment will not reach Hezbollah who would then like to transfer it into Lebanon. But according to the Jerusalem Post on March 3, following a report from the Kuwaiti Al Jarida, Hezbollah recently managed to transfer...
Can Israel Find A Way Out of Its Corner? The Potential Lies in the Axis of Resistance

Can Israel Find A Way Out of Its Corner? The Potential Lies in the Axis of Resistance

The reemergence of violence in Israel has been a nightmare for many Israelis By Joshua Tartakovsky, October 21, 2015   Palestinians in the West Bank are accustomed to being occupied on a regular basis. For them the difference between one day or another is the difference between the degrees of heat to be found in burning flames but not in their very existence. Israelis, on the other hand, have been exposed to unexpected violent outbursts of stabbings that can come from anywhere as lone Palestinians attacked Israelis with knives.  The degree of cruelty needed to stab a civilian bystander from a close range has left many Israelis in shock and panic. So far, the youngest stabber was 13 years old.  Needless to say, Jerusalemites have been looking over their shoulder more than once and several central streets of the city have been empty for several days. The fact that many of the stabbers were Israeli Arabs who attack Israelis within Israel’s formal borders, rather than Palestinians from the West Bank, places Israel in a very difficult position. In previous uprisings, it has been all too convenient for Israel to blame Palestinian Authority President Abbas for an outbreak of violence and to demand an end to official incitement. In fact, Israel’s occupation of the West Bank has been often justified in terms of security. What is one to do, however, when Arab citizens of Israel who reside throughout the country, engage in stabbings of civilians and unleash a wave of terror? These attackers are citizens or residents of Israel proper, not Palestinians in the West Bank. How may such attacks...
Israel’s attack in Syria: why now?

Israel’s attack in Syria: why now?

Israeli army vehicles burn after Hezbollah retaliatory attack January 28, 2015. Photo: AFP/Maruf Khatib CounterFire February 4, 2015 By Joshua Tartakovsky Israeli military support for Al Qaeda’s Syrian affiliate and an attempt to derail talks on Iran’s nuclear programme may be behind Israel’s latest attacks in Syria writes Joshua Tartakovsky The north of Israel is heating up once again and a cycle of renewed fighting between Israel and Hezbollah seems once again likely. On January 18, in an attack attributed to Israel carried out by a helicopter, six fighters of Hezbollah and an Iranian general were killed. The attack took place in Quneitra, Syria, not far from the border between Syria and the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. Of the seven killed, two were well-known: Jihad Mughniyeh, son of the esteemed Hezbollah commander, Imad Mughniyeh (who himself was killed by a joint operation of Israel and the US two years ago), and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard general, Mohammed Ali Allahdadi. In response to the bombing, Hezbollah fighters attackedan Israeli military convoy of three cars with anti-tank missiles. The attack took place in Shebba Farms, a strip of land that Israel annexed in 1981 and which Hezbollah claims is occupied Lebanese territory. Two Israeli soldiers were killed in the attack. In response, Israel practiced its long-held tradition of collective punishment and of considering any attack that takes place from Lebanon as one for which the Lebanese government is directly responsible. It retaliated by shelling neighboring Lebanese villages indiscriminately and killed a Spanish UN Peacekeeper. While Israel had increased the of its Iron Dome launchers, it failed to prevent the attack that took place from a...