Greece is Being Filled with Economic Migrants, Not Refugees, While Merkel Orders More

Greece is Being Filled with Economic Migrants, Not Refugees, While Merkel Orders More

(All photos by Joshua Tartakovsky. All Rights Reserved (C) 2016). By Joshua Tartakovsky 4 March 2016 First we had the Hotspots, where Greece was ordered by the EU to create locations where refugees and migrants will be placed.  Greece was told the Hotspots would be there for a short period, and a government minister said refugees would be placed there for 72 hours only. But reality proved otherwise. A fence was constructed along the border with Macedonia and Merkel said the migrants must remain in Greece. The Slovak Prime Minister said Greece must be “sacrificed” and blamed it for not stopping the refugee flood from Turkey, as if it could do anything.   Now, the Greek islands are now full with migrants ,chaos is the name of the game and tourism has been sinking for months. Migrants are arriving at 5,000-7,000 a day and growing. But that was not enough. On Saturday, came the order. Chancellor Merkel, who refused to compromise with Greece on its debt despite the fact that it cannot ever recover economically without a stimulus and is sinking deeper and deeper into depression, said that Greece is not doing enough to accept refugees although the country cannot even provide for its own. Merkel ordered Greece to work at a “lightening speed.” An order is an order, when the Führer decides something, it must be carried out.   Lebanon also accepted refugees. In fact, 25% of the total population are now refugees. But Lebanon is a good member of the global society. It abides by international law. In Lebanon, migrants and refugees have freedom of movement. Not...
Footage from Stepanovka: A Town Heavily Destroyed by the Ukrainian Army

Footage from Stepanovka: A Town Heavily Destroyed by the Ukrainian Army

One who is exposed regularly to the Western mainstream media gains the impression or, in fact, the absolute knowledge, that Ukraine is defending itself from “Russian aggression.” My visit to Donetsk and its surrounding environment made it clear, however, that actually it is the people of Donbass who are being bombarded by the Ukrainian government. Their, supposedly, own government.  Who will defend the civilians of Donbass from their own government when it bombs them while receiving international impunity and support? Below is a video took of the town of Stepanovka in the Donetsk region on my visit there on April 21-23, 2015. Many homes were destroyed and their residents were killed. Is our media not failing us by not showing us these pictures and failing to notify us on the war crimes taking place in our name by the Western-supported Kiev...
Socialist Economist Dimitris Kazakis: Syriza Has No Plan B

Socialist Economist Dimitris Kazakis: Syriza Has No Plan B

Dimitris Kazakis (source: http://www.candianews.gr) Wednesday, 20 May 2015 00:00By Joshua Tartakovsky, Truthout | Interview We live in times when national sovereignty is being eroded in favor of global capital. Syriza plans to continue with austerity and has made no serious plan B. All actions taken so far reveal that Syriza intends to continue with the austerity program and in the summer Greece will probably sign a new contract of continued austerity. The question remains whether the people will rise against the loss of sovereignty. This interview was conducted on April 1, 2015, with Dimitris Kazakis, leader of the United Popular Front (E.PA.M). The party opposes austerity and was founded in 2011 by people who participated in anti-memorandum demonstrations in Greece. Kazakis is a socialist economist who worked in the private sector in the past. The interview has been amended and shortened. Joshua Tartakovsky: Do you think that the current government has some kind of plan B in mind or are they just trying their best? Dimitris Kazakis: I don’t think they even have a plan A. In the first week after the elections, they tried some general idea, like the European Convention on debt issues. The European Union rejected it so they [the Greek government] abandoned the whole idea. On the second level, they tried to negotiate some kind of elimination of debt, but nobody wanted it, and they did not want to go into a confrontation with the lenders, so they lost ground. Since the agreement of February 20, the Greek government abided by the rules of the loan agreement. The agreement of February 20 had contradictions in it. It...