This is a Betrayal: Interview with Professor Spyros Marketos

This is a Betrayal: Interview with Professor Spyros Marketos

Photo: telesurtv.net Telesur | Blogs By Joshua Tartakovsky 15 July, 2015 ​Professor Spyros Maketos teaches at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, is a member of the Truth Committee on Public Debt and a member of Antarsya. Joshua Tartakovsky (JT): Professor Spyros Marketos, how are most people in Greece reacting to the memorandum? Obviously people to the left of Syriza or even within Syriza are not happy but, the how does the vast majority, those who voted No in the referendum, view the agreement? and what is the media saying about the agreement? Sypros Marketos (SM): I can only give my impressions. Here we don’t have solid data on this but the first sentiment seems to be a numbing of the public. People were really joyous after the last plebiscite. After all this joy, this victory, the complete turn around of the government left them with no joy and there was agony until last morning and now people don’t really believe what had just happened. There is a large percentage of the people who are incredulous about what is happening but there are others that are very angry because this is not the first time something like this happens in Greece. Papandreou was elected promising to give money, and he imposed the first memorandum. Samaras has been elected as anti-memorandum and he imposed the second memorandum, and now Tsipras has been elected with the promise to tear the memoranda and now he brings the third memoranda. So people are now much less credulous and gullible than they were towards the previous governments before. Secondly, people know that the road to the...
Tsipras Capitulated, We Owe It to Greece to Speak Out

Tsipras Capitulated, We Owe It to Greece to Speak Out

  Photo: Reuters. The picture above appeared in this article.  Telesur 10 July, 2015 This past Thursday, the Greek government represented by Alexis Tsipras handed over the final proposal to the Troika. In return for a bailout of 50 billion euros for the next three years and a short-term financial bridge, Tsipras agreed to major cuts, raises in VAT which will affect negatively most Greeks, and slashing of pensions which were already cut by 50 percent since the first bailout. Just 6 days ago, this past Sunday, 61 percent of the Greek public voted for its dignity and against capitulation to the Troika, despite the fact that they were placed under economic siege and financial blackmail. The majority of the Greek people voted against a proposal which would cut 8 billion euros of public funds. Now Tsipras offered the Eurogroup 13 billion euros in a new proposal. It remains to be seen whether the German Bundestag will accept this capitulation. As far as Tsipras is concerned, however, the decision has been made. Many people on the international Left are naturally sympathetic to Syriza and to Alexis Tsipras. They understand the immense pressure he was placed under, and respect the fact that he managed to take a tough negotiating position with the Troika entirely on his own. Yet, what they fail to understand is that Tsipras is not Greece, and Tsipras is not Syriza. The last proposal cannot be defined as anything else but capitulation. This is due to the simple fact that it would involve major cuts in pensions and a rise in VAT while Greece would cut 13 billion...
Socialist Economist Dimitris Kazakis: Syriza Has No Plan B

Socialist Economist Dimitris Kazakis: Syriza Has No Plan B

Dimitris Kazakis (source: http://www.candianews.gr) Wednesday, 20 May 2015 00:00By Joshua Tartakovsky, Truthout | Interview We live in times when national sovereignty is being eroded in favor of global capital. Syriza plans to continue with austerity and has made no serious plan B. All actions taken so far reveal that Syriza intends to continue with the austerity program and in the summer Greece will probably sign a new contract of continued austerity. The question remains whether the people will rise against the loss of sovereignty. This interview was conducted on April 1, 2015, with Dimitris Kazakis, leader of the United Popular Front (E.PA.M). The party opposes austerity and was founded in 2011 by people who participated in anti-memorandum demonstrations in Greece. Kazakis is a socialist economist who worked in the private sector in the past. The interview has been amended and shortened. Joshua Tartakovsky: Do you think that the current government has some kind of plan B in mind or are they just trying their best? Dimitris Kazakis: I don’t think they even have a plan A. In the first week after the elections, they tried some general idea, like the European Convention on debt issues. The European Union rejected it so they [the Greek government] abandoned the whole idea. On the second level, they tried to negotiate some kind of elimination of debt, but nobody wanted it, and they did not want to go into a confrontation with the lenders, so they lost ground. Since the agreement of February 20, the Greek government abided by the rules of the loan agreement. The agreement of February 20 had contradictions in it. It...
Unless Faced With Popular Opposition, Syriza Will Turn Into an Empty Promise

Unless Faced With Popular Opposition, Syriza Will Turn Into an Empty Promise

The Syriza government has not shown publicly that it views exiting the Euro as a real option, leaving it at a dead end, captive to the whims of Germany. (Photo: Christos Siarris / Shutterstock.com) Truth-Out.org Friday, 27 February 2015 13:40 By Joshua Tartakovsky, Truthout | News Analysis In the latest agreement with the Eurogroup, in which the Greek government had won four months of respite, Syriza had also managed to backtrack on its election promises and agree to the imperatives laid out by Eurogroup chief, Jeroen Dijsselbloem. It has been untruthful, yet it will inevitably run into problems along the road. Earlier, it could have been suggested that Syriza has a Plan B in mind. One could have interpreted the meeting held between Tsipras and the Russian ambassador to Greece immediately following his appointment as prime minister as a sign indicating that Greece has additional cards on the table. Furthermore, it could be argued that the Greek government intends to pursue a process of radicalizing the public, which is in favor of remaining in the Euro, by making it go through the process of negotiations, rejection and humiliation. Faced with the suffocating demands of the Troika, now renamed Institutions, the public would realize that it cannot free itself from austerity as long as it remains part of the Euro. However, the Syriza government has not shown publicly that it views exiting the Euro as a real option, leaving it at a dead end, captive to the whims of Germany. Following the Eurogroup agreement, Prime Minister Tsipras said that “we succeeded at the end of our main purpose,” while clarifying that Greece “won the battle...